What water moves

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water collaboratories

The sounds of Yana Wana, the ‘Spirit of the Water’ echo from Ajehuac Yana (Spring Lake). You hear them now, across unknowable virtual distances. Water travels, it puts a stutter to colonial water practices - blurring Western imaginaries that bound and seal some humans from relations with/in leaky worlds. Crystallized in discourses of child development, children’s encounters with water are all-too-often frozen within settler logics of innocence that veil uneven human implication in precarious watery entanglements. In times of ongoing white supremacy, advanced capitalism and settler colonialism, water makes visible possibilities for alternative relations, foregrounded on Indigenous ontologies of relationality and care on stolen lands. Forging relations with water is both restraining and enabling – where currents seep and swell between fraught histories, damage and hope.